Aptima® Mycoplasma genitalium assay

Expand your menu with a significant, emerging STI


Mycoplasma genitalium (M. gen) is an emerging STI present in approximately 10.2% of women and 10.6% of men.1 Often misdiagnosed, M. gen shows similar symptoms to chlamydia, gonorrhea, and trichomoniasis making it difficult to clinically identify.2 CDC now recommends M. gen testing for all patients with recurring cervicitis and urethritis.3

When identifying M. gen, the test you choose matters

NAAT is the CDC recommended method for detection of M. gen.3 Infections carry very low bacterial loads, and each organism contains 1000s of rRNA copies versus only one copy of DNA. The rRNA-based NAAT Aptima® Mycoplasma genitalium assay provides up to 100% sensitivity in the detection of M. gen, and delivers results from multiple specimen types including vaginal swabs collected with the Aptima® Multitest Swab.4,5


References: 1. Gaydos C, et al. Molecular Testing for Mycoplasma genitalium in the United States: Results from the AMES Prospective Multicenter Clinical Study. J Clin Microbiol. 2019;57(11):e01125-19. Published October 23, 2019. doi.org/10.1128/JCM.01125-19 2. Martin D, Mycoplasma genitalium infection in men and women. UpToDate. Last updated April 2, 2021. Accessed September 10, 2021. 3. Workowski, et al. Sexually Transmitted Infections Treatment Guidelines 2021. MMWR Recomm Rep 2021;70(4):1-187.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.rr7004a1. 4. Le Roy C, Pereyre S, Hénin N, Bébéar C. French prospective clinical evaluation of the Aptima Mycoplasma genitalium CE-IVD assay and macrolide resistance detection using three distinct assays. J Clin Microbiol. 2017;55(11):3194-3200. 5. Aptima Mycoplasma genitalium assay. US package insert AW-17946. Hologic, Inc., 2019. 
 

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Expand your menu with a significant, emerging STI

Mycoplasma genitalium (M. gen) is an emerging STI present in approximately 10.2% of women and 10.6% of men.1 Often misdiagnosed, M. gen shows similar symptoms to chlamydia, gonorrhea, and trichomoniasis making it difficult to clinically identify.2
 

When identifying M. gen, the test you choose matters

M. gen infections carry very low bacterial loads, and each organism contains 1000s of rRNA copies versus only one copy of DNA. The rRNA-based NAAT Aptima Mycoplasma genitalium assay provides up to 100% sensitivity in the detection of M. gen, and this CE-marked test delivers results from multiple specimen types including vaginal swabs collected with the Aptima Multitest Swab.3,4


References: 1. Gaydos C, et al. Molecular Testing for Mycoplasma genitalium in the United States: Results from the AMES Prospective Multicenter Clinical Study. J Clin Microbiol. 2019;57(11):e01125-19. Published October 23, 2019. doi.org/10.1128/JCM.01125-19 2. Martin D, Mycoplasma genitalium infection in men and women. UpToDate. Last updated April 2, 2021. Accessed September 10, 2021. 3. Le Roy C, Pereyre S, Hénin N, Bébéar C. French prospective clinical evaluation of the Aptima Mycoplasma genitalium CE-IVD assay and macrolide resistance detection using three distinct assays. J Clin Microbiol. 2017;55(11):3194-3200. 4. Aptima Mycoplasma genitalium assay. UK package insert AW-14170-001. Hologic, Inc., 2019. 
 
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