Aptima® Trichomonas vaginalis assay

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      Overview

      Package Inserts

      The Most Common Curable STI

      Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) is the most common curable STI in the United states.1 Over 3.7 million people in the United States have TV, which is a higher prevalence than chlamydia and gonorrhea infections combined.1 The CDC recommends testing women for TV infection if they are symptomatic or at increased risk of infection.2 The CDC and ACOG also recommend the use of a highly sensitive and specific test, such as the Aptima® Trichomonas vaginalis assay.2,3

      Detect Up To 100% of TV Infections

      The Aptima Trichomonas vaginalis assay is an rRNA-based NAAT that provides up to 100% sensitivity in detecting TV for both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients.4 This assay overcomes challenges associated with traditional, less sensitive methodologies because it can detect a fraction of one organism, whereas wet mount requires at least 10,000 motile organisms/mL to visualize.4,5

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      Safety Data Sheets

      References:
      1. CDC. CDC Fact Sheet: Incidence, Prevalence and Cost of Sexually Transmitted Infections in the United States. https://www.cdc.gov/std/stats/sti-estimates-fact-sheet-feb-2013.pdf. February 2013.  2. Workowski, et al. Sexually Transmitted Infections Treatment Guidelines 2021. MMWR Recomm Rep 2021;70(4):1-187.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.rr7004a1. 3. ACOG Practice Bulletin. Vaginitis in Nonpregnant Patients. Washington; DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; 2020:135:e1-17. No. 215. 4. Aptima Trichomonas vaginalis Assay. US package insert 503684. Hologic, Inc., 2020. 5. Garber GE. The laboratory diagnosis of Trichomonas vaginalis. Can J Infect Dis Med Microbiol. 2005; 16(1):35-38. doi.org/10.1155/2005/373920

      Aptima® Trichomonas vaginalis assay

      Placeholder image

        Overview

        Package Inserts

        The Most Common Curable STI

        Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) is the most common curable STI in the United states.1 Over 3.7 million people in the United States have TV, which is a higher prevalence than chlamydia and gonorrhea infections combined.1 The CDC recommends testing women for TV infection if they are symptomatic or at increased risk of infection.2 The CDC and ACOG also recommend the use of a highly sensitive and specific test, such as the Aptima® Trichomonas vaginalis assay.2,3

        Detect Up To 100% of TV Infections

        The Aptima Trichomonas vaginalis assay is an rRNA-based NAAT that provides up to 100% sensitivity in detecting TV for both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients.4 This assay overcomes challenges associated with traditional, less sensitive methodologies because it can detect a fraction of one organism, whereas wet mount requires at least 10,000 motile organisms/mL to visualize.4,5

        Ordering Information

        Safety Data Sheets

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        References
        1. WHO. Herpes simplex virus. World Health Organization. Last reviewed May 1, 2020. Accessed. September 10, 2021. https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/herpes-simplex-virus. 2. WHO. WHO guidelines For The Treatment of Genital Herpes Simplex Virus. World Health Organization. Last reviewed March 11, 2016. Accessed September 10, 2021. https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/978924154987 3. Workowski, et al. Sexually Transmitted Infections Treatment Guidelines 2021. MMWR Recomm Rep 2021;70.  4. Aptima HSV 1 & 2 assay. US package insert AW-15346-001. Hologic, Inc., 2019. 5. LeGoff J, et al. Diagnosis of genital herpes simplex virus infection in the clinical laboratory. Virol J. 2014;11:83. doi:10.1186/1743-422X-11-83. 6. A. Jassem, Comparative Evaluation of the Aptima HSV 1&2 Assay and a Lab Developed Real-time PCR Test for Detection of HSV-1 and HSV-2 Viruses, presented at ESCV 2016 Poster No. PP20.